Friday, January 23, 2015

Word of the Day -- Spats

Spats, a shortening of spatterdashes, or spatter guards are a type of classic footwear accessory for outdoor wear, covering the instep and the ankle.

Spats were primarily worn by men, and less commonly by women, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They fell out of frequent usage during the 1920s. Made of white cloth, grey or brown felt material, spats buttoned around the ankle. Their intended practical purpose was to protect shoes and socks from mud or rain but this footwear also served as a feature of stylish dress in accordance with the fashions of the period.

Increased informality may have been the primary reason for the decline in the wearing of spats. In 1923 King George V opened the Chelsea Flower Show, an important event in the London Season, wearing a frock coat, gray top hat and spats. By 1926 the King shocked the public by wearing a black morning coat instead of a frock coat (a small but significant change). This arguably helped speed the Frock coat's demise (although it was still being worn on the eve of the Second World War). Spats were another clothing accessory left off by the King in 1926. Interestingly it is said that the moment this was observed and commented on by the spectators it produced an immediate reaction; the ground beneath the bushes was littered with discarded spats.

By the mid 1930s high topped shoes and spats were regarded as being very old fashioned "The high
Senator Sumner wearing spats and Longfellow
topped shoes your grandpa used to creak around in" although the same newspaper report from 1936 predicts the return of spats amongst fashionable men despite "Observing that in recent years well-dressed men have been discarding spats because they have become the property of the rank and file." This seems to indicate another reason for their decline.

The third reason is probably the most significant, and the most prosaic - once western city streets became cleaner; due to the replacement of horses by cars and the use of asphalt and concrete - there simply was much less filth about and consequently much less need for "spatterdashs". Although some elderly men continued to wear them into the 1950s as part of their business garb since the second war the wearing of Spats seems to have been confined to places like the Royal Enclosure at Ascot or very fancy private weddings.

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